Sunday, 19 February 2012

Royal Ontario Museum - Part 3!

EDIT: I accidentally deleted all my pictures. I'm really sorry! I don't know how to get them back.
Beautiful, isn't it?

This is part 3 of my trip to the Royal Ontario Museum. The two previous parts were from last year; for this part, I recently went to the ROM a couple of weeks ago.

The picture you see above is a grave relief of Iostrate. Elaborate grave monuments were a major form of sculptural art in the Classical period.
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It's Heracles/Hercules!

And, relating to Heracles' brauns, I will talk about the next thing I saw - artifacts from Greek sports! As you may already know, the Ancient Greeks were the ones who first did the whole Olympics jazz, with the Olympic games first being instituted circa. 776 BC in honour of ZEUS

Yeah, this guy.

The Greeks did a lot of stuff, and physical training always played an important rule in mens' lives back then.
(Trivial Fact: Did you know that the word gymnasium is derived from the Greek word gymnos, which means "naked"? This is probably related to the fact that men who participated in the Olympics wore nothing). So, in essence, naked guys were the predecessors of javelin throwing, boxing, wrestling, equestrian events, running, and pentahlons!


Well, although this fresco is actually from the Minoans (who were pre-classical Greeks), guess what this fresco was reputably shown for?

Sorry if it's so small... this was the best picture I could find of it.

This famous Minoan fresco was featured for the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece! (Sadly, you won't find this fresco in the ROM...) Well, I think I diverged from the topic at hand here enough (which was about my trip to the ROM). I'll start getting back on track now...


Here are some real things that I saw at the ROM which I took pictures of!

Just look at these beautiful works of art about Greek athletics! ^-^!
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A replica of the Athena Parthenos. It's been lost in history, but many famous writers such as Pausanias gave us amazing descriptions of it. There are also many copies of it around the world; an American artist even made a real life-size replica (a.k.a., a HUGE COLOSSAL one) in Tennessee!

Here is Alan Lequire (the American artist) working on Athena!
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I also saw a very unique yet strange artifact shaped like a pig... it was too irresistable to NOT take a photo of it!

Here is what the description box said about this pig-shaped nozzle:

RHYTON (drinking vessel)
In the form of a boar's head. A plain version of a red-figure vase shape.
So, I guess people drank out of these things then? I sometimes wish cups today would be as glamourous or as intricately detailed as this one!
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Wow. This picture took a longer time than the others to upload... o.o!

This is Faustina the Elder's bust. She was the wife of Emperor Antoninus Pius.

Wow! This one took a long time to upload too... hmm, maybe I just have a bad sense of time.

This person is Lucius Verus. He was adopted by Antoninus Pius, the wife of the woman above, and Lucius here served as a co-emperor of Rome with Marcus Aurelius (you probably heard of him in Gladiator). If you actually knew who Marcus Aurelius was without watching Gladiator, then please watch this following trailer, MINECRAFT STYLE. Sure, there are some historical inaccuracies, but you can't really expect much from Hollywood.

:D


Here is the last bust I took a picture of.

He is Emperor Septimius Severus, a soldier who defeated rival candidates of being emperors to become on himself in 193 AD.

Hmm, I think this blog post is getting a bit long now, and I haven't even posted half of my photos yet! If anyone actually does read my blog (which, in reality, 0 people read this blog), I'll post the other photos in parts too. Expect parts 4 and 5 sooner or later! (Probably the latter).